Wishes Sampler Quilt Along Block 7

Block 7 Court House Lawn

Block 7 Court House Lawn

Are you ready to get another block made?  Be sure to go the Fat Quarter Shop to download your free block pattern, watch the video, and make a donation to the Make-A-Wish foundation.  This block looks a little more difficult than it really is.  The Fat Quarter Shop has written very precise instructions so if you follow along, the block will be made in a jiffy.  It’s actually rather a fun block to make so go get yours done.

Christmas Sampler Block 4

Block 4 Guiding Star

Block 4 Guiding Star

The Guiding Star block for today’s block has been chosen by Dot in PA.  She went with paper-piecing and a smaller block.  This block measures 6″ finished size.  The directions and templates for making this block can be found by going to Marcia Hohn’s quilter’s cache website so click here to get over there.

I did not have any gold in the fabric pieces I am using for my sampler and since the rule is to make do, I went with what I did have.   Also, I just used two colors rather than three.  You might notice that my four corners are turned differently than the original.  When I was laying out my pieces, of course I had to play a bit, and I liked having the corners turned.  One of my rules is…it’s my block, my quilt, and I can do what I want.  That same rule applies to you too so make your block however you want to.

Even though this block is smaller than the last three blocks, it seemed to take a bit more time to construct.  Find a few minutes here and there and it will get done.  Be sure to stay caught up with your blocks as that is the key to having all your blocks done before Thanksgiving.  I always say, keeping up is much easier than catching up so stop reading and go sew your block.

I am looking forward to seeing what block we get for #5.  Be sure to check back and see what it is.

Quiltmaker 100 Blocks Volume 8

Quiltmaker 100 Blocks Vol 8

Quiltmaker 100 Blocks Vol 8

As you have probably guessed by now, I love making random blocks just for the fun of trying out the block. Many of them find their way into some of the sampler quilts which are among my favorite quilts to make.  I am very blessed to be a quilt-block tester for Quiltmaker magazine’s special issues of Quiltmaker 100Blocks.  I love testing the blocks as it gives me something to look forward to doing.

This is one of the samplers I have made from test blocks for the Volume 8 magazine. These were made about a year ago and I was using fall fabrics as it was my intention to have the quilt ready to use for the fall season.  I sketched out a setting plan, put the blocks up on the design wall to find how I wanted them arranged, and proceeded to cut the pieces to put it together.  Then I realized that the idea I had for the setting was not the most ideal for the blocks so I was back to thinking about a new setting.

If you have read any of my previous posts, you know Jacob did a big clean-up in the studio. He took all started projects and put each ever so neatly into its own container and labeled the container with what was in it.  He really did a nice job.  This is one of the quilts that he moved.  Once out of the studio and out of sight, it sure is hard to get back to them.  So of course, this quilt came to a big stand-still.  This summer while he was gone for a bit, I got this quilt out to finish and wouldn’t you know, I had forgotten why I stopped working on it.  I looked in the container and there were all the blocks with nice little labels for their position and all those pieces already cut so I thought, why not whip this up and be done.

I had sewed quite a bit of it together when I realized the problem and remembered why I had stopped in the first place. I laid it out to look at it and mull over how I would like to change it.  That was right about when Jacob came back.  He looked at it and said, “Grandma, you have to take that apart and do something different.”  I’ve been trying to teach him that everything doesn’t have to be perfect so I told him that it’s just a quilt and it really does not matter if it is a little strange.  What I didn’t tell him was that I was thinking about changing it without his telling me that.  I decided to quit thinking about it, follow my own advice to him, and just get it done.

It makes me smile to think that years from now when I’m gone and a stranger is using the quilt, they will be wondering what I was thinking. They will probably ponder and make guesses.  I will be in heaven smiling and thinking it’s too bad they just don’t know the answer is that I am a bit quirky.  In any case, at least the quilt makes a good conversation piece!

Anyway, at last the quilt is done and ready to use this fall. It’s filled with wonderful blocks and who cares about the setting when you can just enjoy all the creativity in the blocks.

Starting in the top left corner and going from left to right, these are the blocks in this sampler:

#720 Polaris by Sheri Diesburg

#783 Home Sweet Home by Lori Holt

#799 Which Way by Kathryn Wilson Tucker

#757 Martha’s Basket by Martha Walker

Row 2:

#773 Waffle by AnneMarie Chany

#764 Shrinking Squares by Pippa Eccles Armbrester

#704 Bouclier de la France by Susan Guzman

#761 Formation by Shayla Wolf

Row 3:

#792 Ruffled Feathers by Jennifer Oden

#711 Flower Power by Melissa Peda

#714 Shadow Play by Jennifer Schifano Thamas

#745 Lone Star Twist by Sara Khammash

Row 4:

#790 Watermark by Cindy Lammon

#747 Dutch Basket by Jo Morton

#702 Grandpa’s Gift by Karen Comstock

#788 Sailor’s Delight by Jo Kramer & Kelli Kramer

Row 5:

#708 Basket of Oranges by Kay Mackenzie

#721 Pin-whirl by June Dudley

#767 The Weaver Block by Sandi Blackwell

#725 Starbright by Kristy Lea

 

If you look in the magazine, you will notice that the blocks made by the designers look different. We do not get to see the actual blocks when we are testing and we use much different fabrics.  The difference in the fabric choices can really change the look of the block.  I never cease to be amazed at all the different blocks and the creativity of the designers.

In addition to the blocks I tested that are in this sampler quilt, I also tested a few other blocks for this volume which I will use at another time. Would you like to see those blocks too?

This is block #731 Circle of Life by Amy Rullkoetter.

731 Circle of Life

731 Circle of Life

This is block #733 A Night Out by Carolyn Beam.

733 A Night Out

733 A Night Out

This is block #734 It Snowed! By Cheryl Brown.

734 It Snowed!

734 It Snowed!

This is block #743 Posies by Lynda Howell.

743 Posies

743 Posies

This is block #754 Winter World by Paula Stoddard.

754 Winter World

754 Winter World

This is block # 755 Fairy Floss by Helen Stubbings.

755 Fairy Floss

755 Fairy Floss

I hope you have enjoyed seeing the test blocks from Quiltmaker 100 Blocks Volume 8. You can still purchase a copy of this magazine in the magazine’s online quilt shop.  Be sure to look for Volume 10 which will be available in about mid-November.  I am excited to show you the fun blocks I tested for Volume 10.

 

Wishes Sampler Quilt Along Block 6

Block 6 Susannah

Block 6 Susannah

Time to get another block made for the Wishes sampler.  Go to the Fat Quarter Shop to get your free block pattern, watch the video, and make a donation to the Make-A-Wish foundation.  When this block is made, we are half done with all the blocks.  Isn’t if fun to play along!

See you next week.

Christmas Sampler Block 3

Block 3 Santa Face

Block 3 Santa Face

Our block 3 has been chosen by Trina in VA. She found this cute block on Marcia Hohn’s quilter’s cache website. This Santa Face is one of Marcia’s original block patterns and you can find her directions by clicking here. This is a 12” finished size block

I decided to make mine with a few different cuts than the original. The end result is still the same but I thought you might like to see how I made mine.

Here is what I cut:
Pink:
1 rectangle at 3-1/2” x 9-1/2” (face)

Red:
1 rectangle at 3-1/2” x 6-1/2” (hat)
1 rectangle at 2” x 12-1/2” (bottom of hat)

White dot:
1 rectangle at 2” x 12-1/2” (hat brim)

White:
1 rectangle at 3-1/2” x 12-1/2” (beard)
2 rectangles at 2” x 3-1/2” (beard on sides of face)

Green:
8 squares at 3-1/2” (background)

For the top of the hat, we are going to be making one flying goose unit. Draw a diagonal line on the back of two of the background squares. With right sides together, align one on the end of the red 3-1/2” x 6-1/2” rectangle. Sew on the line; trim seam allowance to ¼”; press out. Repeat on the other end with the drawn line going in the opposite direction. Your flying goose unit should measure 3-1/2” x 6-1/2”. Stitch a background square to each end of this unit.
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Sew the remaining red rectangle and the hat brim rectangle together along the long edge and press toward red.
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Draw a diagonal line on the back of two of the background squares. Pay attention to orientation and place one on each end of the rectangle. Be sure you look at it before you sew. Sew on the drawn line; trim seam allowance to ¼”; press out.

look at the lines before you sew

look at the lines before you sew

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Sew a small white rectangle to each side of the face.
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Draw a diagonal line on the back of the two remaining background squares and again paying attention to orientation, align on each end of the beard rectangle. Look again and be sure. Then sew on the line; trim the seam allowance; press.

pay attention to line directions

pay attention to line directions

You should now have 4 rows and each row should measure 3-1/2” x 12-1/2”. Lay out your rows. Sew the rows together. The block should measure 12-1/2” square.

lay out 4 rows

lay out 4 rows

where is santa's face?

where is santa’s face?

Santa needs a face. There was no applique piece given for the mustache so we have to draw our own. I folded a piece of paper in half and drew one half and then cut it out so both sides were equal. Actually, I made about 3 before I decided to quit trying so hard and just go with it. This is why I recommend using paper to make your pattern before cutting your fabric. Once I had the shape, I traced it onto applique fusible and fused it to a piece of the white fabric. Then I got out my circle template that I’ve had for over 40 years and still use it a lot. I just picked a size for the eyes and a little bigger one for the nose. You could draw around a dime or some other circle if need be. You could also use buttons. I did not use buttons because I don’t have just the right ones and also to make it easier to quilt. How you do yours though is totally up to you.

make your mustache on paper first

make your mustache on paper first

circle template

circle template

Remember those corners that were cut off in the making of the block…well I sewed the pieces together; pressed and then trimmed squares to 2-1/2”. In this kind of sampler without a plan and the blocks can be different sizes, it is nice to already have some units made that could be used as filler in places. I love to see if I can use up all kinds of odds and ends in making the sampler.

waste triangles that won't be wasted

waste triangles that won’t be wasted

Which ever method you use to make your block, just get it done..that’s the key to having all the blocks made before Thanksgiving. Check back next Friday to see what surprise is in store for block 4.

Sampler Quilts

These samplers are made with blocks from the 2009 Thimbleberries Club called 3’s Company. That year the quilt was made with twelve 12” and thirty-six 6” blocks along with some printed applique blocks.  In addition, there were three choices of fabrics to choose from.  The fabrics were all the same print and colors but it was the saturation of the color in the fabrics that was changed.  As was the norm with Thimbleberry Club quilts, the club project was a huge quilt and since I do not care to make such big quilts, I made mine differently than the given layout.  I used two out of the three color variations.

This first quilt, made with the lightest of the fabrics, is made with all twelve of the 12” blocks and all 36 of the 6” blocks. I came up with my own setting to get them all into one quilt.  You can see that four of the smaller blocks ended up in the border corners.

Morning Mist

Morning Mist

This sampler has the same 12” blocks but in the fabrics with more saturation of the same prints. I used the 12 big blocks and a different setting for this version.  It really changes the look and you have to study it to find the same blocks in the lighter quilt.  What a difference it makes when the value is changed.

Out Came the Sun

Out Came the Sun

For this third quilt, I used the set of thirty-six 6” blocks along with some of the applique prints. These blocks are made with same fabrics as the previous quilt, but again a whole different look.  This one is my favorite.  Since I did not use the printed applique blocks in the first sampler, I must still have them.  Guess I just need to make another quilt.

Summer Breeze

Summer Breeze

Wishes Sampler Quilt Along Block 5

Block 5 Log Cabin

Block 5 Log Cabin

Another easy block in the Wishes Sampler.  Be sure to go to the Fat Quarter Shop to download your free pattern, watch the video, and make a donation to the Make-A-Wish charity foundation.  They have reached about 80% of their goal so anything you can add will help.  Fat Quarter Shop and Moda are matching $10,000 to the donations.  In addition, the FQS is also auctioning the original quilt and the proceeds will also be added to the fund.  They have a link if you would like to place a bid for the quilt.

Are you keeping up with making the blocks?  You can get this one done in just a few minutes.  I love log cabin blocks and always enjoy adding them to any sampler.

See you next week with block 6.